Shoot, and I'll move!

Your Characters Don’t Have To Be Good People

howtofightwrite:

No, really, they don’t. In fact, it’s better if they’re not. When you’re writing, especially if you’re writing violence, you can fall into an easy trap: you the writer know that violence is bad, but you also know that your character is good so they cannot perform bad acts and any act they perform is good so long as it was well-intentioned. You can get into the problem of your protagonist taking actions that are as bad as the villains they’re fighting and the only justification is: they’re not a bad person or they didn’t mean it.

Well, I’m sorry. Kante is made of fairy dust and bullshit.

Violence is a nasty business and characters must shoulder the burden of the consequences. Good people do bad things for good reasons and bad people do good things for bad ones, neither is any more or less culpable than the other. They exist in the same space because, you see, it’s the action itself that matters and not the meaning behind it. A reason is not the same thing as an intention.

Intention: “I shot that guy over there but I really didn’t mean it, so I’m not culpable.”

Reason: “I shot that guy over there so that the orphans over here wouldn’t starve, I’m definitely culpable but this is why.”

One character is trying to say that because they feel a certain way that the rules don’t apply to them. The other is making a choice to do something to achieve a goal, what that goal happens to be is up to the character. It could be something noble like saving starving orphans or it could be something cold like killing a man for money. Both acts can actually have good outcomes and they can also have bad ones, but what is important to remember is that the way a character feels about it changes nothing in how others may perceive them. However, their reasons may. This doesn’t require you the author to say that what they did was okay, even if their actions were for a good cause.

I’ve seen too many novels bend over backwards to attempt to morally justify the unjustifiable for one character and then condemn the same actions by another. Characters do bad things sometimes, but even then, they’ll still be worthy of love and respect from the reader.

-Michi

(vía clevergirlhelps)

fuckyeahcharacterdevelopment:

What biases does your character have? Do they have any ignorant opinions and beliefs? What do they base it on? Are there any facts that support their opinions or discredit the opposing opinions? Do they believe any misconceptions as fact that support their opinions or discredit the opposing opinions?

How did their history up to this point lead them to these biases, opinions, and beliefs? How do their biases, opinions, and beliefs effect their life and character development from this point on?

itsfrenchthellama:

dazedwinter:

braydaaan:

kiss-the-g1rl:

unshaped:

filling a bathtub with the substance, throwing the person you hate the most in the tub and throwing the ice cube in the tub right after …. it would be over

such evil minds in this place

i love this evilness 

Nah, don’t just throw it in you gotta flick it dramatically over your shoulder without looking as you walk away, preferably with a darkly humorous one-liner.

"The cold never bothered me anyway"

Okay so I did a quick search and this seems to be supercooled water, distilled or purified water cooled t just below the freezing point, it starts crystallizing when disturbed or in contact with ice.

(vía ninjakey)

Warning Major Spoiler!

onesentencemusings:

bagelr:

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Moment of silence for all the people who will never see this joke because they blocked the word ‘Spoiler’.

(vía linguerpicuet)

tastefullyoffensive:

[threepanelsoul]

(vía peejsterm)

Anónimo said:
psychopath vs sociopath, what's the difference?

thewritingcafe:

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A Tutorial Masterpost

norisus:

Some tutorials that I’ve come across, organized both for my own viewing pleasure and to hopefully assist others as well. I update this list whenever I come across new, helpful pieces.

A lot of these are hosted on my personal Tumblr, but I don’t change my url so it’s pretty safe to bookmark them there (and not have to worry about the url changing) if you don’t wish to reblog them yourself for whatever reason.

Feline tutorials:

Canine tutorials:

Avian tutorials:

Human(oid) tutorials:

Facial features:

Neck, shoulders, arms, back, and torso:

Legs, hips, and feet:

Hands:

Full body and poses:

Hair and skin:

Other:

Dragon tutorials (and bat wings):

Equine tutorials:

Cervine tutorials:

Ursine tutorials:

Miscellaneous animal tutorials:

Background and objects tutorials:

Clothing tutorials:

General painting, drawing, and style tips:

Hand and wrist health:

Hope these help!

homicideophilia:

Poisons and Associated Physical Manifestations.

(vía thewritingcafe)

ioweyouasoul:

LISTEN UP MOTHER FUCKERS

SEE THIS WEBSITE? 

ITS CALLED WOLFRAM ALPHA

THIS IS THE BEST GODDAMN WEBSITE FOR ACADEMIC SHIT. FUCK GOOGLE. 

THIS MOTHERFUCKER WILL LET YOU SEARCH “HOSPITAL BEDS IN CHAD VS. IRAN” 

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AND IT GIVES YOU A STRAIGHT GODDAMN ANSWER 

MAYBE YOU’RE NOT INTERESTED IN DOCTORNESS HAVING TROUBLE WITH MATH?

image

HOLY SHIT

OR MAYBE YOU WANNA DICK AROUND

image

WHATEVER THE FUCK YOU WANT

(Fuente: literalmarveltrash, vía puddingskinmcgee)

Anónimo said:
how do i avoid writing the stereotypical YA 'pretty yet angsty boy'.

thewritingcafe:

Here are common traits to avoid:

The Stalker

I’ve read plenty of these characters and they all stalk a female character in some way. They often follow female characters because they don’t believe these characters have good judgement or that they can take care of themselves. Then it’s written off as romantic. Not only does this undermine female characters, but it romanticizes creepy and abusive behavior. Don’t let your character stalk girls. Don’t let your character stalk anyone while making it seem romantic.

The Edward Cullen

I call it this because when the Twilight series reached its peak, characters like Edward Cullen were showing up everywhere. These characters are good looking and everyone wants them, but they don’t want anyone else. Until the underdeveloped female protagonist comes along.

Your character can be attractive, other people can have a crush on them, and they can have a crush on the female protagonist, but it’s best to avoid:

  • Literally every girl wanting this guy except the protagonist.
  • Pushing the “not like other girls” reason for this character liking the female protagonist.

Abusive

These characters are abusive in subtle ways at first, but after a while it gets too much and the author continues to romanticize this. If your male character is abusive, do not write it off as romantic. Use it as a chance to address this issue. I’ve seen authors write these characters being physically abusive and controlling as romantic and I’ve seen authors write non-consensual sexual encounters as desirable.

No Boundaries

These characters do not care for the wishes or boundaries of others:

  • Oh, you have a boyfriend and/or you don’t want to get involved with me? Too bad, I’m going to kiss you anyway.

That happens way too often and the author makes it come off as something that is okay. These characters get involved with issues they have nothing to do with. They feel the need to know everything about everyone and no one confronts them about their nosiness. If your character doesn’t respect the privacy of others, don’t write it all as desirable, romantic, or okay.

"I’m a Monster"

I can’t tell you how many times I’ve read characters who keep trying to warn others to stay away from them because they’re monsters or troubled or dark undeserving souls. Saying this once or twice is okay, especially if this character is emotionally vulnerable, but after a while it gets annoying and it makes your character sound whiny. 

These characters insist they are dangerous and that other characters should stay away from them, yet they continue to pursue these characters and never really give a good reason why.

Perfect

These characters have an endless supply of everything they need. Do your characters need guns? Perfect! The Pretty Enigmatic Special Boy will now disappear without a word, return silently, and carry a bag full of guns with him. When asked, this character refuses to answer or gives a vague answer.

These characters are physically fit, good looking even when covered in blood, sweat, and dirt, have tons of knowledge on many subjects (especially any conflicts or phenomena your characters are trying to solve or get through), always win their fights (physical and verbal), and have pretty much no flaws. Everything they do is written as something to goggle over. Give your character some flaws that get them into trouble or that affect their narrative.

Vagueness

These characters are extremely vague. They never give straight answers. They make people wonder about their past even when they have no reason to hide anything about their life. This is not the same as being quiet or shy. These characters are vague on purpose. Every question they answer is carefully crafted to create vagueness. And all the other characters accept it, see it as intelligent, or see it as romantic.

Let your character give some straight answers every now and then. They can still be vague, but use it sparingly and only when needed. Think about why your character would want to be vague.

No Change

These characters are unbelievably static. From start to finish, nothing about them changes. They don’t learn from anything because they’re always right. They may warm up to other characters, but nothing much beyond that happens. They’ll still make the same decisions, they still have the same opinions, they still see the world in the same way.

The Angst

Here is information on writing angst.

How to Fix It:

Give your character flaws. Make them change over time. Let other characters respond accurately and don’t romanticize unhealthy behavior. To romanticize something is to make it seem beautiful, desirable, or better than it actually is. You can include the above traits, but it’s really about how you write it that matters.

You can also look at my male characters tag on the tags page for more tips, things to avoid, and male characters that are not as common in fiction.

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